Tag Archives: travel

The ORIGINAL Strange But True Aviation News

8 Jun

Uh, the flight attendants are leaving but you want US to stay on this plane?  An Air Canada pilot found himself trying to convince passengers to stay on a flight from Ottawa to Vancouver despite the flight attendants walking off over a smell from the air filter system, reports the Globe and Mail. Mail columnist Gary Mason happened to be on the flight as the drama played out over Twitter. Mason and most of the passengers (and 1 of the flight attendants) decided to stay on the flight.

There’s a difference between walking and flying? American-Iranian Muslim U.S.  citizen Kavon Iraniha is back in the USA after a year studying law in Costa Rica — and finding himself on the No-fly list, reports NBC San Diego.  As Iraniha tried to return to San Diego, he was told he was on the no-fly list. He was questioned by the FBI, but still not allowed to fly home. So he decided to fly to Tijuana, Mexico, then walk across the border.

No more snow in Puerto Rico. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration arrested 36 people at San Juan’s Luis Munoz Marin International Airport after breaking up a drug ring that smuggled more than 61,000 pounds of cocaine on passenger flights since 1999, reports MSNBC.  The sting managed to capture some current and former American Airlines employees.

That’s not the right way to do a pat-down.  Five Transportation Security Administration screeners at Southwest Florida International Airport were fired and another 38 were suspended after an investigation found that passengers weren’t being properly screened, reports NaplesNews.com. Another screener saw the problem and reported it to TSA.

Can you sue dead people? Ok, you have to follow this CNN Travel story closely, kids. Melissa Schram lost her common-law husband in a plane crash where a drunk passenger allegedly kicked the pilot’s seat, which caused the crash. You with me so far? Now Schram is suing the estate of the dead pilot, claiming he shouldn’t have let the drunk pilot on the Cessna-185F floatplane that crashed.

For the umpteenth time – drinking and flying don’t mix!! Grandmother Frances Macaskill has been ordered to repay Qantas A$18,245 after her flight from Melbourne to Perth had to return after her drunken behavior, reports the Sydney Morning Herald.  Macaskill was seen drinking duty-free liquor and began fighting with passengers and shouting profanities aboard the flight, which led to her arrest and a sentence of four months in jail and a A$3,500 fine.

Dude — you can’t sail on the runway!!  A runway at Boston-Logan International Airport was temporarily closed after an empty sailboat broke away from its mooring and running aground at 9/27, reports NYC Aviation.

So I guess the hookers, booze and poker are out too?  Airlines starting service out of Las Vegas’s McCarran International Airport are traditionally greeted with showgirls and an Elvis impersonator.  But Dutch carrier ArkeFly won’t get that deal because the arrival of its first flight is too close to the arrival of President Barack Obama, who is coming to town for an official visit, reports USA Today.

The were really “stuck” on this flight.  An Allegiant Airlines flight from Phoenix to Central Nebraska Regional Airport got stuck in the dirt after the pilot made a sharp turn off the taxiway, reports the Omaha World-Herald.  The return flight was delayed nearly five hours while a new plane was brought in.

美國的航空公司的失業的工人應學漢語 (translation: Unemployed American Airline Workers Should Learn Chinese). Representatives of China’s air carriers are reaching out to American Airlines workers who may lose their jobs as the company continues to shed jobs while in Chapter 11: learn Chinese, reports Forbes. Chinese carriers are looking for cabin crews as they continue to grow.

FOAM PARTY!!! Workers at an Eagle Aviation hangar based at Texas’ Abilene Regional Airport got a surprise when they arrived at work: a facility filled with foam, reports ReporterNews.com.  A fire suppressant system went off, causing the foam to fill the hangar and the surrounding outside area.

I’m sorry, but you need to create your own caption on this one, kids. Dutch artist Bart Jansen was distraught over the deal of his cat Orville, named after Orville Wright.  So he decided to keep the dead cat with him forever by turning him into a flying helicopter, reports the Daily Mail.  He called Orville ‘half cat, half machine’, adding he had become a visual art project to pay tribute to the dead animal.

Why Delta’s ‘ Basic Economy’ Fare Is All Your Fault

5 Jun

A Delta jet at the gate in Atlanta. Photo by Benét J. Wilson

According to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Delta Air Lines has begun testing rock-bottom “basic economy” fares on selected routes — and you, the traveler, have no one but yourselves to blame.

Why is it your fault? Because you refuse to pay the higher fares that Delta and other airlines want you to. And since you refuse, they are going to get the money out of you other ways, by hook or by crook. Take a look at what fees have been introduced in the past 10 years: checked bags, food, drinks, change fees, phone booking fees and fuel surcharges, to name some.

So Delta for the past two months has been testing fares that are remarkably similar to those offered by Spirit Airlines, on some of the routes that the ultra-low-fare carrier flies, including Detroit to Orlando, Fort Myers, Fort Lauderdale and Tampa. With basic economy, travelers can’t make any changes to their itinerary, nor can they choose seats in advance.

You may hate what Spirit does (see why in this guest blog post), but you can see how other airlines have followed some of the things they do.  And someone does like the airline, because they have full flights and regularly make a profit. 

So if Delta is successful with this test, look for it to expand the basic economy fares into other markers.  And don’t be surprised if other airlines follow.

Best of Aviation Queen: Why We Travel

29 May

Editor’s note: Kids, I’m still recovering from the holiday weekend, so today you get a Best Of.  This post first appeared on the blog on Feb. 16 and was inspired by a great New York Times slide show and presentation on why we travel. Enjoy!

There’s so many bookmarks under my aviation/travel links.  The New York Times has been doing this ongoing slideshow called “Why We Travel.” It features some fantastic photos, along with the stories behind then, from the newspaper’s readers.  Looking at those slideshows got me to thinking about some of the cool places I’ve been, confirming why I travel (besides the fact that it has been a part of my job the past 20 years). So below are 10 sights I’ve seen on my travels.

  1. The vast bareness of Greenland. I was flying a 30-seat Saab 340 turboprop from Linkoping, Sweden (where the plane was built) to Minneapolis to deliver it to then-Northwest Airlink carrier Mesaba Airlines.  You just can’t fly direct on a turboprop, so we made several stops, including one in Greenland. It was cold and so stark and barren, it was almost beautiful in a bizarre sort of way.
  2. The colored roofs of Iceland. On that same trip, we spent the night in Reykjavik. As we were landing, I got to sit in the cockpit, which gave me a stellar view of this island nation’s ubiquitous colored roofs.
  3. New Year’s Eve, Times Square, New York City.  I hate crowds.  But in 2004, my sister the police detective, who lives in California, came out to the East Coast with a friend to celebrate New Year’s Eve at Times Square. We spent the day wandering the Times Square area. Everywhere we went, she chatted with cops, who were out in full force.  So as the celebration drew closer, the area went on lockdown. But we got a prime watching spot because the cops recognized my sister and gave us better and better viewing spots. Sweet!!
  4. The food halls of Singapore. During my second trip to Singapore to cover the biannual air show, me and some of my journalist friends found ourselves frequenting these great eat places.  One of my favorites was outdoors, and if you’re adventurous, just order a Tiger Beer and let your server choose what to eat. I sampled whole fried duck (which included the head and feet), chili crabs, fish ball soup and shark’s fin.
  5. Mass at Notre Dame Cathedral, Paris, France.  I’ve been an on-again, off-again Catholic for quite a while. During one of my on phases, I happened to be in Paris for the Paris Air Show. Some friends said we should go to mass, and off we went. One of the best things is no matter what the language, you know exactly what’s going on.
  6. Honolulu International Airport. I was on my way to Indonesia for the launch of a new turboprop, and we had a 3-hour layover here.  It was pre-9/11, so I actually ventured outside to see the gardens.  The flowers were colorful and beautiful, and I can still smell them to this day.
  7. Embraer aircraft plant, Gavião Peixoto, Brazil.  I was on one of my many visits to this Brazilian manufacturer, which is headquartered in São José dos Campos.  We flew a small jet to this city, located in the Brazilian state of São Paulo, which is home to, among other things, the assembly lines for the Embraer 190 and 195 jets and final assembly for Phenom business jets. I noticed was how incredibly green and lush the region was, home to sugar cane fields and orange groves.
  8. The Corn Palace, Mitchell, S. Dakota. Back in 1992, completely burned out from a very stressful job, I quit and decided to take a road trip across America with my friend Mark, who was moving to Seattle to do his medical residency. Since neither of us was in a rush, we took the scenic route, which included a trip to this facility, which features ever-changing murals made out of corn on the outside walls and colorful onion domes.  The moon landing — in corn. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. — in corn. The Iwo Jima flag raising — in corn. You get the picture.
  9. Bandung, Indonesia. This city, about 110 miles southeast of Jakarta, is the third-largest city in the country and was home to aircraft manufacturer Industri Pesawat Terbang Nurtanio (IPTN, now Indonesian Aerospace). I was there for the roll-out of the IPTN N-250, which never took to the skies. But the highlight for me was to see an amazing display of Dutch colonial architecture, defined by the tropical Art Deco style. Amazing buildings I saw included the Institut Teknologi Bandung, the Hotel Savoy Homann and Villa Isola.
  10. Taliesin West, Scottsdale, Arizona.  This was Frank Lloyd Wright’s winter home, near the McDowell Mountains. It serves as the home for the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, and offers tours and programming year-round. When I lived in Phoenix, I actually bought a membership and took visitors on tours of this estate. I was never bored, because each guide at the facility always managed to tell me something about Wright that others missed.

Speaking of missed, why do you travel?  What are some of the more interesting or off-the-beaten-path places you’ve seen in your travels?

The ORIGINAL Strange But True Aviation News

25 May

She was left to her own “devices.”  A French woman born in Cameroon caused a US Airways flight from Paris to Charlotte to divert to Bangor, Maine after claiming to be carrying a surgically implanted device, reports Reuters. The woman was questioned by Customs and Border Protection and taken into custody by the FBI.

Maybe Breathalyzers might help. India’s civil aviation minister reports that 14 pilots and 31 crew members were caught reporting for duty under the influence of alcohol between January and March, reports the Times of India. Most of the offenders worked at Jet Airways, it added.

It looks like things flared up in Philly.  A US Airways Express flight from Elmira, N.Y., to Philadelphia experienced a close call when allegedly a flare was shot up around 50 feet of the Dash 8 turboprop, reports USA Today.  The flight landed safely.

A change might be due. Officials at Charlottesville-Albemarle Airport say they are looking at making changes as their security checkpoint after a Piedmont Airlines pilot managed to bring a loaded gun onto a flight, reports the Daily Progress.  The pilot was charge with attempting to carry a weapon or explosive on an aircraft.

FORE!! Staff at Florida’s Hallandale Beach golf course found a big surprise on the greens — an aircraft door, reports the Daily Mail.  The door had fallen off a  Canadair CL60 jet that had just taken off from Opa Locka Executive Airport.

Watch what you say!  A female flight attendant on Brazil’s Trip Airlines had a male passenger tossed off a flight after he was heard making disparaging remarks about the crew’s woman pilot, reports MSNBC.

Hot DOG!  Detroit-based American Coney Island restaurant decided to celebrate its 95th anniversary in a unique way.  It teamed with a local radio station to rent a helicopter to dump almost 1,000 hot dogs and have 25 contestants stuff as many of them on their persons as possible, reports ABC News.  The winner received $1,000 and a year’s supply of hot dogs.

We’ll end the week with a video from our good friends at the New York Aviation website. In this video, a passenger records how the engine cover on a TAM Airbus A320 traveling from Natal to Sao Paulo breaks off and hurls itself into the side of the plane.

INFOGRAHPIC Mobile Dependence: A Growing Trend in Business Travel

10 May

Today we have a twist on the usual Random Aviation Photo.  Our new friends over at PC Housing, a temporary housing provider, sent me this cool infographic that explores the relationship between mobile technology and the business travel population.  I can see myself in more than one of these graphics. Enjoy!!

 

Right Or Wrong? Southwest Sued Over Obese Passenger Policy

7 May

This headline on ABC News – ‘Too Fat To Fly’ Passenger Sues Southwest Airlines For ‘Discriminatory Actions’ - caught my eye, since I’ve blogged several times (here and here).  For my newer readers, I am a woman of size – rubenesque, as it were — but I can still fit in one seat. So I understand the sensibilities on both sides.

I happen to agree with — and appreciate — Southwest Airlines’ policy of how it deals with passengers of size.  But I also see the point of Kenlie Tiggeman, the overweight passenger who was originally judged too fat to fly, who filed the lawsuit.

The problem with the Southwest policy, as Tiggeman (and I) sees it, is the inconsistency in how it is administered.  I’m all for having a row of seats at the end of a ticket counter placed behind a screen if an agent feels someone might not fit into their seat. The issue is that as humans, we all have our own views and prejudices.  I’m betting that if you put Tiggeman in front of 10 different gate agents or even 10 different travelers and asked if she was “too fat to fly,” you’d get myriad different answers.

A few years ago, my daughter and I were flying Southwest home from San Antonio on a full flight.  She was still using her SkyMall stroller/car seat. She was at the window (she can’t block a passenger in) and I was in the middle seat.  A man “of size” came to sit in the aisle seat. I knew it was going to be a tight fit — and it was.

Several flight attendants came by and looked at him, but didn’t say a word. I didn’t say anything because I didn’t want to be rude. I should have. That was the longest 3.5 hour flight of my life.  A passenger who has paid for a seat should not be forced to have a passenger of size taking up their space.

So my wish is that before this goes to court, Tiggeman and Southwest Airlines come up with  a plan that balances the needs of passengers of size to have a consistent second-seat policy with the rights of “normal” sized passengers who deserve to have their own whole seat.

So, what do you think? Is Tiggeman right to sue Southwest Airlines? Do you think Southwest Airlines’ Customer of Size policy?  Tell me!!

The ORIGINAL Strange But True Aviation News

4 May

Did the baby get a pat-down? The Transportation Security Administration found itself closing Terminal C at Newark Liberty Airport after agents failed to screen a baby, reports Gizmodo.  TSA lost track of the family, so the Port Authority shut down the terminal and rescreened all travelers.

Nabbed!!  Employees at US Airways’ hub in Phoenix were dubbed heroes after they captured a prisoner being transferred from Detroit to Yavapai County, reports KTVK-TV. The prisoner had escaped from  two sheriff’s deputies who were escorting him.

This airport has gone to the dogs! A 30-pound Rhodesian Ridgeback puppy escaped from his kennel during a transfer at LaGuardia Airport, causing the facility to close for 10 minutes while we was recaptured, reports USA Today.

This ISN’T Candid Camera! Grant Calderone received a warning letter from the FAA after he used his iPad to videotape a bird strike aboard a Delta Air Lines flight from New York to Los Angeles, reports CNN. The letter said his record would be expunged after two years.

2, 4, 6, 8 – what airport do we appreciate? Go Dalian Airport!  China’s Dalian International Airport has found a unique way to soothe travelers when their flights are delayed — cheerleaders, reports CNN.  The airport had the cheerleaders perform during a recent  fog delay.

We’ll end the week with a video I learned about from our good friends at the Brown Girls Fly blog.  It’s around the world, to 17 Countries in 343 Days and 6237 Photographs. Enjoy!

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